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Content Hierarchy

simple hierarchy of recruiting content - simple

 

This element of the framework is specific to the recruitment marketing space. Taking some notes from Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, this is effectively the Hierarchy of Recruiting Content.

The stages of the hierarchy are, starting from the most basic and simple, brand, location, job, job experience and the elusive and aspirational “satisfaction.”

Why a hierarchy? Because if you try to build content at a given stage without explaining the stages leading up to it to a prospect’s satisfaction, the content will lack resonance and credibility. For example, if I read content about an amazing job with teammates and employees dedicated to the completion of a goal, I might be excited to apply (as it pushes a lot of my personal job triggers). But if it turns out that the job is in the suburbs of Chicago (location) and isn’t easily train accessible, it’s not a job I can apply to because I live in the city and don’t have a car. Or if the brand is a company I despise for political or personal reasons, I’ll be angered that I got excited about a job working for people I will anticipate hating.

Many companies think they are already answering those questions with a job description, but as the diagram below shows, they do not.

Note that I said that the content has to explain each stage to the prospect’s satisfaction (not the brand’s satisfaction). A job description, with its vague coded language, rarely satisfies anyone. When we talk about location, the brand might assume that listing the city or even the address is enough to satisfy the stage, it really doesn’t. What I want to know about the location is how close to a train stop it is. I want to know if I can bike or walk there. Some people might want to know what restaurants are close for lunch, or if there’s a decent place for coffee, or how close day care options might be. None of these things are ever in a job description.

Why is the “personal and professional satisfaction” stage aspirational? Because its almost impossible to write content designed to fulfill this stage. This stage is fleeting, depending so much on the reader’s state of mind as much as the quality of writing. Have you ever heard someone claim to be funny? That’s an impossible claim. Either the listener thinks that the speaker is funny or they don’t. In many ways, this stage is achieved by executing all the previous stages properly and completely –  as the prospect reads multiple stories and forms a picture of the brand and what working in that role might lead them to.

recruiting content hierarchy

2 Comments

  1. […] This element of the framework is specific to the recruitment marketing space. Taking some notes from Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, this is effectively the Hierarchy of Recruiting Content. The stages of the hierarchy are, starting from the most basic and simple, brand, location, job, job experience and the elusive and aspirational “satisfaction.” Why a hierarchy? Because if you try to build content at a given stage without explaining the stages leading up to it to a prospect’s satisfaction, the content will lack resonance and credibility. Many companies think they are already answering those questions with a job description, but as the diagram below shows, they do not.  […]

  2. […] This element of the framework is specific to the recruitment marketing space. Taking some notes from Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, this is effectively the Hierarchy of Recruiting Conten…  […]

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